Making Sense of the Answer
Date: Oct 15th, 2011 3:11:48 pm - Subscribe
Mood: somber
Currently Reading: Druid Magic by Sutton & Mann

Originally dated: 28th July 2010

I ordered the introduction pack from OBOD- the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids. More information can be found on them at www.druidry.org, which is packed with interesting information and a lively forum that I've been using regularly (but under a different name). I've only scratched the surface with the introduction pack, yet already it seems like a very worth while course. The philosophy that it is based on, such as a reverence for nature and being responsible for the environment in everything that you do are just two points which have been within me for as long as I can remember.

A concern of mine, as would be anyone else's I would imagine, is that Druidry is a practice that belongs in the Neolithic and Bronze age rather than for the twenty-first century. However, reading the pack has made me realise that Druidry in all its aspects- as a practice, an idea, a way of life, a spirituality- is like language (this is in my words and not theirs). To continue throughout the ages and to accept people from all branches of life it must evolve. This is what Druidry has done. Its roots are in the Celtic myths and legends and in the documents of Julius Caesar. This is the raw data of Druidry but to really live it you need to get out into and be with nature. So from these roots is what Druidry today is based on, and it has been developed into a practice that fits with the societies and cultures of the twenty-first century. I guess it will continue to evolve as times change but the idea and philosophy of Druidry will remain.

The book 'Druid Magic' is still proving to be an interesting read. Before beginning this blog I was on a mission to find out what concrete things people do who describe themselves as Druids or as a Druid in Training etc., because of their practice. One of the replies I had was, that if you have to think about it then you're not there yet. My first response to this was:
1. confusment,
2. that it was probably a good answer and
3. unfortunately not what I was looking for.

However, this taken in hand with something I read from 'Druid Magic' (this is not a quote) Druidry brings out what is already within us. I have certainly found this to be true recently and more so the more I read. For instance, a reverence for nature and feeling responsible for the environment. I know there were other things but I cannot remember anyone of them now...maybe that's because I'm there!

This is not to say that Wicca has been discarded. Only that for now I'm going to focus on Druidry, and if Wicca finds its way into my life which I'm sure I'll pursue, then I will welcome it openly. In fact once I've finished 'Druid Magic' I may well hunt down a good book on Wicca.

Love and Laughter

Draganki
Comments: (1)


Definitions defined!
Date: Jun 21st, 2010 1:51:10 pm - Subscribe
Mood: undecided
Currently Reading: Druid Magic by Sutton & Mann; Pagan Pathways by Harvey & Hardman; The Stuff of Thought by Pinker

With further research I need to revise and update where I have got to so far in assesing the difference between Wicca and Druidry. This also includes some extra information about Witchcraft, as you will see why.

Wicca and Druidry are different realities we choose to live by. Based on different principles, ideas
and philosophy, although there are similarities. Such as both are orthopraxic, meaning they have a
recognisable common practice but do not have any dogma. Whereas one difference is that
Wiccan's tend to practice magic more than Druids, who tend to only practice healing magic.
To name oneself as Pagan, the individual must believe in polytheisim; see the material word as
a manifestation of divinity and recognise the female and male aspects of divinity. This is how
Prudence Jones in a chapter on Pagan Theology in Pagan Pathways describes Pagan as a religion.
However, some members of the Pagan and Druid community prefer the Oxford American
Dictionary (2nd Edition, 2005):

pagan |'pāgən|
noun
a person holding religious beliefs other than those of the main world religions.
• dated derogatory a non-Christian.
• an adherent of neopaganism.

neopaganism | nēō pāginizəm; -gə-|
noun
a modern religious movement that seeks to incorporate beliefs or ritual practices from traditions
outside the main world religions, esp. those of pre-Christian Europe and North America.
Neopaganism is a highly varied mixture of ancient and modern elements, in which nature worship
(influenced by modern environmentalism) often plays a major role. Other influences include
shamanism, magical and occult traditions, and radical feminist critiques of Christianity.

Druidry and Wicca can all be practiced with or without religion, they are not religions
themselves because they carry no dogma. Instead both allude to a common world view, shared
practices and are spiritual paths, but in all of this the individual always has a choice. Witchcraft, in
the Traditinal British sense, is usually associated with Paganism, because of the beliefs involved in
the magic which is practiced. However, Paganism is not a religion because there is no dogma or
rules, there are only common beliefs. Druidry and Wicca do not have to be practiced alongside
Pagan beliefs, although this is currently common.
Some see Traditional British Witchcraft and Wicca as interchangebale. On-the-other-hand
one could be Wiccan without practicing Witchcraft as this 'is a path of magic'
(http://www.paganfed.org/pagan-wicca.shtml). Lastly on a final note, for now is that Druidry,
Wicca and Witchcraft all have their individual branches, which hold their own idiocrasies.

Now I've got all that clear in my head it will make finding the right path for myself much easier, I hope. At the moment I don't have any interest in Witchcraft, but what is important to me is living closely with nature and having a better and hightened understanding of the world around me. Wheather that will come from Wicca or Druidry, or practicing both (I would not almagamte them, although some do), or holding a Druid philosophy and practicing Wicca I do not know yet. Further reading and living within nature I should hopefully find my way.

So, happy Summer Solstice!

Love and Laughter
Draganski
Comments: (0)


Should have thought of this sooner.
Date: Jun 18th, 2010 2:16:28 pm - Subscribe
Mood: active
Currently Reading: Druid Magic by Sutton & Mann; Pagan Pathways by Harvey & Hardman; The Stuff of Thought by Pinker

Every blog needs a theme. In regards to the theme for this blog, it should have begun at an earlier date. However, it was only two days ago that I came up with the idea of using this blog in this way. So the reason for this blog is that I am currently trying to find the right Pagan path, and this seems like a good place to store the information and thoughts I acquire as I do so. As I may wish to refer back to it at a later date. If other people come by this and either find the theme of the information of interest then that to me is a bonus!

Why so many books?
I began reading Druid Magic to find a way of bringing Paganism and/or the esoteric into my everyday life, which is a busy one since I am studying for a degree. Celebrating the Sabbats is enjoyable, but I am searching for something what can be done everyday. I know people have their beliefs no matter what, but for some reason I'm in need of something concrete which can be done daily that would not be done if I were not Pagan. While reading Druid Magic I felt the need to understand more of the history. This was also triggered by a discussion on the OBOD forum about "Druidry and Traditional Witchcraft"- both are separate and can be practiced with or without Pagan beliefs. As a result I began reading Pagan Pathways, which I plan to comment more on in later posts. As for The Stuff of Thought, this is purely for my dissertation, but is also a fascinating read.

So, this is where I've got to so far, in assessing the difference between Druidry and Wicca, with regards to Paganism.

Wicca and Druidry are different realities we choose to live by. Based on different principles, ideas and philosophy, although there are similarities, Wicca is considered Pagan and thus a religious path however Druidry is not necessarily Pagan. Although, Wicca is not a religion. It is orthopraxic, meaning it has a common practice which is recognisable but it does not have any dogma.
To name oneself as Pagan, the individual must believe in polytheisim; see the material word as a manifestation of divinity and recognise the female and male aspects of divinity. This is how Prudence Jones in a chapter on Pagan Theology in Pagan Pathways describes Pagan as a religion.

However, the second paragraph is highly debatable; especially the part of polytheism. Since with the joy if the English Language word meaning is forever changing.

I am open to any comments that criticise the information in this blog and any comments which add to this.


Love and Laughter
Draganski
Comments: (0)


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