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Another card game ends with assault charges Aug 25th, 2009 5:07:35 pm - Subscribe
Mood | rambunctious

A Salt Lake City woman is accused of throwing shot glasses at her husband and attempting to stab him with a cane after the two argued over a card game earlier this week.

The 58-year-old woman was playing cards with her husband, daughter and her daughter's friend Sunday near 800 West and 300 North when she became upset over the game, according to charging documents filed Tuesday in 3rd District Court.

The woman pelted her husband and daughter with shot glasses. The daughter and the daughter's friend left the house, and the woman then began hitting her husband in the head with a cane, charges state.

The cane broke and the woman pointed it at her husband and threatened to stab him, according to the charges. She then found a baseball bat and began striking her husband with it. The man had to seek medical treatment for his injuries, charges state.

The woman is charged with third-degree felony aggravated assault, domestic violence assault, a class B misdemeanor, and criminal mischief, also a class B misdemeanor.

She is being held in the Salt Lake County jail on $25,000 bail.

Charging documents do not specify which card game the woman was playing, but the incident is the latest reported attack from a card game gone awry.

An Orem man whose luck ran out in a game of Uno was arrested Aug. 15 on suspicion of aggravated assault after he allegedly hit a woman and threatened her husband with a large kitchen knife.



The 58-year-old man, who had been drinking, was playing cards in his home with his 47-year-old nephew and the nephew's wife, 64, when he became agitated over the game, police said.


He hit his nephew's wife on the back of the head and when the couple later tried to leave, he waved a large kitchen knife at his nephew, Orem police said.

Police arrested the man on suspicion of aggravated assault and on three outstanding warrants.





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Couple charged with abusing autistic son Aug 23rd, 2009 8:12:40 pm - Subscribe
Mood | frantic

At least once each summer, Kelly Holtman and her son Nathan spend a day at Tracy Aviary.

They catch up on their lives, admire the birds and wildlife and enjoy the peace and quiet the Aviary has to offer.

"It's just such a nice atmosphere to be in," Kelly Holtman said. "It's good to see all of the kinds of birds that the aviary has."

For many, the facility provides a chance to get away from regular life and take family or friends for an inexpensive day together.

The aviary, founded in 1938, is moving forward with an ambitious plan to remake its attractions, and build appeal for patrons in winter months. To that end, the aviary has $19.6 million to spend, authorized in a November ballot. Administrators are tasked with making the renovations and upgrades in three years, said project consultant Paul Svendsen.

"It will be a tough deadline," he said. "But it's a deadline we have to make."

Problems in the aviary, in Salt Lake City's Liberty Park, are many. The drainage system is insufficient. Many of the buildings at the site are aged and worn. The aviary, while unique in the fact that many of the birds roam free, is not big enough to allow the wildlife needed space. And the entrance is hard to find.

"I think the people who ran the aviary in the past have been nice, well-intentioned people," Svendsen said, "but things just weren't getting done."

That's where the bond money comes in. Svendsen on Sunday outlined

plans for change at the aviary. New indoor rain forest exhibits, focusing on the birds and habitat of Mexico and Panama will be created, he said.


Plans, estimated to cost about $2 million, would completely renovate the Wilson Pavilion, one of the most deteriorated buildings on site, which will enable visitors to visit the aviary in winter.

The entry plaza also would be renovated and new shows and education facilities added.

"These are all important to us," Svendsen said. "We have to get it done because we suffer a steep decline in attendance after Pioneer Day. In the winter months, there are days when our visitor count is literally in single digits. We also have to get it done because we promised the public that we would."





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Little-known agency helps map and build trails Aug 23rd, 2009 7:34:19 pm - Subscribe
Mood | sorrowful

Brian Head »Already a destination for serious mountain bikers, the town of Brian Head is upgrading its system of hiking, biking, horse and motorized trails with the help of a little known federal program.

The Rivers Trails and Conservation Assistance Program (RTCAP) is helping this mountain town in Iron County identify, map and mark its trail system as part of a trails master plan.

The Brian Head project is one of five around Utah that is supported by the RTCAP, the community outreach arm of the National Park Service.

Marcy DeMillion, who heads the office in Salt Lake City, said the Brian Head project will eventually connect existing trails with those already on the Dixie National Forest and nearby Cedar Breaks National Monument.

Her office is supplying in-kind services equivalent to about $15,000 for the project, which will also identify where to put trailheads, informational kiosks and signs. A logo to identify the trails will also be developed.

The trails can also be used in winter for skiing, snowshoeing and snowmobiling on motorized sections.

DeMillion said the Brian Head project and four others were chosen from a pool of 12 for work this year.

RTCAP chooses projects based on such criteria as whether they will engage young people and be supported by ongoing partnerships with government agencies, including those that promote the health benefits of using the trails.



"Communities bring energy and enthusiasm to their projects," said DeMillion.

Brian Head town manager Bryce Haderlie said RTCAP's help will save the town a lot of money on a new system that will benefit residents and visitors both.

"We hope this improves the information ... and increases the number who want to use the system," said Haderlie.

He said existing trails aren't well coordinated, but when the project is completed, probably in 2011, users will find a seamless system identified by logos and signs.

In Moab, officials are excited to see the city's Lions Park project going forward.

Kimberly Schappert, executive director of the Moab Trails Alliance, said it will become the focal point for the community.



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Man critical after being shot by Taylorsville police Aug 23rd, 2009 7:02:56 pm - Subscribe
Mood | patriotic

Taylorsville »A Taylorsville man remained in critical condition Sunday after he was shot by police attempting to speak with him about a domestic dispute.

Officers arrived at the man's home just before midnight after someone called 911 about a domestic dispute that appeared violent near 3200 West and 5800 South, said Detective Shannon Bennett.

Robert Holliday, 37, returned to the house as officers were investigating, but fled when he saw police. They caught up with him several blocks away, near 5900 South and 3340 West, at the edge of a field. Holliday confronted them with what appeared to be a handgun, Bennett said.

Bennett declined to say whether the object was a weapon.

"It looked like a handgun. Whether or not it actually was a handgun, we're not releasing that information," he said. The object presented an "obvious threat of death or serious bodily injury," he said, and both officers fired their weapons. Holliday was critically hurt and taken to Intermountain Medical Center.

The officers were not injured. They were placed on paid leave, as is department policy, and the shooting will be investigated by the Salt Lake County District Attorney's Office. Their names were not released.

Neighbor Benita Garcia said she was in her driveway when she heard 15 to 20 shots fired in blasts of a few shots, with pauses in between.

"They didn't need to be shooting at him that

many times," she said. "Why didn't they just tase him?"


She said Holliday moved to the neighborhood about a year and a half ago, and he was often in the front yard playing with his twin 3-year-old sons.

Her husband, Mike Garcia, said Holliday is a friendly neighbor.

"If I needed a hand and saw him, all I needed to do was ask," he said.

Ken Hollinger, who lives five houses from the shooting scene, said he heard 10 to 12 gunshots, prompting him to leave his house and walk toward the noise. He saw the victim lying on the sidewalk with paramedics giving him aid.

Dillon Fryer, who lives two houses from the shooting site, said he was awakened by gunshots. It sounded like firecrackers in his backyard, he said. "But I grew up in Rose Park so I knew it wasn't."

Fryer moved to Taylorsville about eight years ago to live in a quieter neighborhood and said he was unnerved by Sunday's shooting.

A woman who answered the door Sunday morning at Holliday's house declined to comment. Bennett said officers have been to the house several times on different types of calls, including domestic violence.

Holliday has a history of run-ins with police. He pleaded guilty to misdemeanor failure to stop at the command of a police officer and DUI charges in 2006, and misdemeanor assault and discharging a weapon from a vehicle charges from 1996, according to court records.




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Tracy Aviary renovations move forward Aug 23rd, 2009 6:42:23 pm - Subscribe
Mood | hateful

At least once each summer, Kelly Holtman and her son Nathan spend a day at Tracy Aviary.

They catch up on their lives, admire the birds and wildlife and enjoy the peace and quiet the Aviary has to offer.

"It's just such a nice atmosphere to be in," Kelly Holtman said. "It's good to see all of the kinds of birds that the aviary has."

For many, the facility provides a chance to get away from regular life and take family or friends for an inexpensive day together.

The aviary, founded in 1938, is moving forward with an ambitious plan to remake its attractions, and build appeal for patrons in winter months. To that end, the aviary has $19.6 million to spend, authorized in a November ballot. Administrators are tasked with making the renovations and upgrades in three years, said project consultant Paul Svendsen.

"It will be a tough deadline," he said. "But it's a deadline we have to make."

Problems in the aviary, in Salt Lake City's Liberty Park, are many. The drainage system is insufficient. Many of the buildings at the site are aged and worn. The aviary, while unique in the fact that many of the birds roam free, is not big enough to allow the wildlife needed space. And the entrance is hard to find.

"I think the people who ran the aviary in the past have been nice, well-intentioned people," Svendsen said, "but things just weren't getting done."

That's where the bond money comes in. Svendsen on Sunday outlined

plans for change at the aviary. New indoor rain forest exhibits, focusing on the birds and habitat of Mexico and Panama will be created, he said.


Plans, estimated to cost about $2 million, would completely renovate the Wilson Pavilion, one of the most deteriorated buildings on site, which will enable visitors to visit the aviary in winter.

The entry plaza also would be renovated and new shows and education facilities added.

"These are all important to us," Svendsen said. "We have to get it done because we suffer a steep decline in attendance after Pioneer Day. In the winter months, there are days when our visitor count is literally in single digits. We also have to get it done because we promised the public that we would."





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0 Comments | Post Comment

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